Archive: Latin America Grants 2003-2014

GUATEMALA

Adopt-a-Village: 2007 – 2009
ASOGEN (Assocation Generando) : Partner since 2013
CEADEL:  2009 – 2013
Comundich:  2007, 2008, 2009/10
FNE (New Hope Foundation): Partner since 2010
Guatemala Friendship School: 2007
Maya aj Sya: 2009 – 2014
Women’s Justice Initiative (WJI): partner since 2013

HAITI

Haitian Health Foundation – 2004
Haiti Konpay – 2008, 2009/10
Lambi Fund of Haiti – 2004, 2005, 2007
Light for All – 2008, 2009/10
Peasant Movement of Haiti – 2004

MEXICO

CEDICAM – 2003, 2004, 2005, 2009/10
Circle of Women – 2011
Flor y Canto – partner since 2012
Kinal Antsetik – 2004
Puente – 2012
Sikanda – partner since 2012

NICARAGUA

Aqua Para la Vida – 2003
El Porvenir – 2003
Jubilee House –  2004, 2006, 2007
Living Earth Institute – 2008

 

Latin America Grantees by Year

2014

GUATEMALA

Association Generando (ASOGEN)Guatemala: ASOGEN provides comprehensive services to women survivors of domestic violence in the Department of Chimaltenango.  ASOGEN uses professionals to promote empowerment and education in human rights in a series of workshops, and provides advocacy by means of negotiation and lobbying with decision-makers to implement and enforce laws against femicide. In this second grant year, Pangea supported: holistic service to women survivors of violence; training and empowerment workshops for women leaders and survivors of violence; advocacy, negotiation and lobbying with decision makers of central government and officials of institutions such as Ministry of Governance, CONAPREVI, Mayor’s Office, and congresspersons from their district.

MAYA AJ SYA Guatemala: This was Pangea’s 7th and final year with Maya aj Sya. provides a bilingual school for youth ages pre-school to 6th grade. They are part of a larger network of eight schools in Guatemala – AMEP (Alliance Maya for Popular Education). Over the past seven years, Pangea provided funds for general operating support as well as a restricted grant for purchase of land for construction of a new school.  Maya aj Sya educates Mayan youth about traditional language, culture and beliefs, providing a learning experience thy can use in every part of their lives. Parents, teachers and board members are also trained to effectively participate. The community is strengthened as children return as teachers.  In 2014 Pangea funds supported the program for education of girls, boys and adolescents in leadership skills; teacher orientation and education in student learning; school for parents; worksops in various arts, cooking and recycling; visits to successful educational programs.

NEW HOPE FOUNDATION (FNE) Guatemala: FNE is located in an indigenously populated area in the Department of Baja Verapaz. This area was devastated by armed conflict and violence in the early 2000’s. In addition to involving youth in community/ economic projects, FNE offers bilingual education in traditional Maya Achi culture and beliefs by creating masks, costumes and dances to explain the concept of Mayan Cosmovision. Since 2010, Pangea grants have supported the bilingual education program and helped to establish the New Hope Cultural Center for local art traditions of Maya Achi people.  In 2014 Pangea continued to support  the strengthening of rural secondary education and  to help strengthen the abilities of male and female students and families in the area of health and nutritional sovereignty, safety and participation in the decision making re the correct use of natural resources.

WOMEN’S JUSTICE INITIATIVE (WJI) Guatemala: WJI works to empower women through rights education and leadership development. WJI developed a Women’s Rights Education Program for women to learn how to protect their rights and combat gender-based inequality and violence in their communities. Pangea’s 2014 grant provided general operating support to enable WJI to expand into an additional five surrounding communities where they will conduct their six month series of weekly workshops in both women’s rights and leadership-skill building.

MEXICO

FLOR Y CATO Oaxaca, Mexico: Flor y Canto is an advocacy organization for 12 indigenous and peasant communities in the Mestizos Central Valley of Oaxaca. All leadership is community-based and organizations are grassroot. It provides legal advice and education on laws impacting rights to water and, thus, sustainable livelihoods. In 2014 Pangea supported the dissemination of the Right To Consultation and Previous Free and Informed Consent, including:

• Education of 15 communities regarding prohibition decree and water management.
• Active involvement of 15 communities of COPUDA in preparing and carrying out
Consultation.
• Formation of 3 teams of 3 community promoters to inform communities about Consultation
• Assistance to Council and local committees of COPUDA to implement Consultation.
• Help for 5 local committees to carry out and administer rainwater harvesting projects.

Latin America Grantees 2013

GUATEMALA

AFEDES, GuatemalaAFEDES was a first year Pangea grantee/partner for 2013. Located near Guatemala City in the Department of Sacatapéquez, AFEDES works to alleviate endemic povery and malnutrition by helping women improve their skills in sustainable agriculture practices and to create greater food security. The Pangea grant w funded the training of seven women leaders from AFEDES-supported communities in sustainable and diversified farming. To augment the training, spaces were created for exchanging and trading of organic products.

ASSOCIATION GENERANDO (ASOGEN), GuatemalaASOGEN was another organization new to Pangea in 2013.  ASOGEN provides comprehensive services to women survivors of domestic violence. Among its services:  ASOGEN uses professionals to promote empowerment and education in human rights in a series of workshops, and provides advocacy by means of negotiation and lobbying with decision-makers to implement and enforce laws against femicide in the Department of Chimaltenango. Our grant funds were used for general support of the ASOGEN programs.

CEADEL, GuatemalaMany girls and boys leave to join the labor force, particularly in the textile-manufacturing industry that began in the 1990s. CEADEL was founded to defend, protect and demand the rights of children, adolescents, youth and working women.  Pangea has supported this organization for the previous four years. In 2013 Pangea funded a scholarship program focused on helping youth leave the workforce and return to school. The scholarship included school supplies and fees, extra-curricular activities for skill-building and self-esteem, family counseling on the importance of education and an advocacy component for children’s rights, helping youth leave the workforce and return to school.

MAYA AJ SYA, GuatemalaMaya aj Sya provides a bilingual school for youth ages pre-school to 6thgrade. They are part of a larger network of eight schools in Guatemala – AMEP (Alliance Maya for Popular Education). Over the past five years, Pangea has provided funds for general operating support as well as a restricted grant for purchase of land for construction of a new school. During 2013 we continued our general support. Maya aj Sya educates Mayan youth about traditional language, culture and beliefs, providing a learning experience they can use in every part of their lives. Parents, teachers and board members are also trained to effectively participate. The community is strengthened as children return as teachers.

NEW HOPE FOUNDATION (FNE), GuatemalaFNE is located in an indigenously populated area devastated by armed conflict and violence in the early 2000′s. In addition to involving youth in community/ economic projects, FNE offers bilingual education in traditional Maya Achi culture and beliefs by creating masks, costumes and dances to explain the concept of Mayan Cosmovision. Since 2011, Pangea grants have supported the bilingual education program and helped to establish the New Hope Cultural Center for local art traditions of Maya Achi people.  In 2013 our grant continued to support the bilingual education program by providing teachers’ salaries, educational materials and other support for additional 7th and 8th grade sections.

WOMEN’S JUSTICE INITIATIVE (WJI), GuatemalaWJI was the third organization new to Pangea in 2013. WJI works to empower women through rights education and leadership development. WJI developed a Women’s Rights Education Program for women to learn how to protect their rights and combat gender-based inequality and violence in their communities. Pangea’s 2013 grant provided general operating support to enable WJI to expand into an additional five surrounding communities where they  conducted their six month series of weekly workshops in both women’s rights and leadership-skill building.

MEXICO

FLOR Y CATO, Oaxaca, MexicoFlor y Canto is an advocacy organization for 12 indigenous and peasant communities in the Mestizos Central Valley of Oaxaca. It provides legal advice and education on laws impacting rights to water and, thus, sustainable livelihoods. This second year grant implemented a training program for local and agricultural authorities. Flora y Canto developed an intervention method for improving communication, gender equality and education. Their series of workshops and consultancies continued to promote the care and defense of water as a human right. All leadership is community-based and organizations are grassroot.

SIKANDA, Oaxaca, MexicoSikanda was founded by two graduate students – one from Oaxaca – who had worked for a decade in marginalized/impoverished communities in Latin America, Asia and Europe. This was Pangea’s second grant to Sikanda and was used to set up and equip the Worm Composting Center of Oaxaca (WCCO) for the larger scale production of compost. Sikanda also provided training workshops in worm composting and assisted in its marketing. While empowering women in these marginalized commununities, Sikana’s aims to transform their families’ relationship towards waste.

2012

CEADEL – $6,000 Guatemala:  Many girls and boys leave to join the labor force particularly in the textile-manufacturing industry that began in the 1990s. CEADEL was founded to defend, protect and demand the rights of children, adolescents, youth and working women.  Pangea has supported this organization for the previous two years. The 2012 Grant offered a scholarship program focused on helping youth leave the workforce and return to school. It also included school supplies and fees, extra-curricular activities for skill building and self-esteem, family counseling on the importance of education, and an advocacy component for children’s rights.

MAYA AJ SYA – $10,000 GuatemalaMaya aj Sya provides a bilingual school for youth ages pre-school to 6th grade. They are part of a larger network of eight schools in Guatemala – AMEP (Alliance Maya for Popular Education). Over the past two years, Pangea has provided funds for general operating support as well as a restricted grant for purchase of land for construction of a new school. During 2012 we continued our general support. Maya aj Sya educates Mayan youth about traditional language, culture and beliefs. It strengthens community as children return to the communities as teachers.

New Hope Foundation (FNE) Guatemala$10,000  FNE is located in an indigenously populated area devastated by armed conflict and violence in the early 2000s. Our first grant, last year, helped to establish the New Hope Cultural Center for local art traditions of Maya Achi people. FNE offers youth bilingual education in traditional Maya Achi culture and beliefs by creating masks, costumes and dances to explain the concept of Mayan Cosmovision. It also gets youth involved in community/economic projects. Our 2012 grant supported a bilingual education program by providing teachers salaries for additional for 7th and 8th grade sections, and educational materials.

Flor y Canto – $6,000 Mexico:  Flor y Canto is an advocacy organization for 12 indigenous and peasant communities in the Mestizos Central Valley of Oaxaca. It provides legal advice and education on laws impacting rights to water and thus sustainable livelihoods.This first year grant will train and promote the legal establishment of a Coordinating Committee of United Peoples in the Defense of Water. It will also develop a series of workshops and consultancies to promote the care and defense of water as a human right.  All leadership is community-based and organizations are grassroot.

 Hub Oxaca – $5,000 MexicoHUB Oaxaca is linked to the international network of “Hubs”, working for social change in over 30 cities around the globe, and serving as a catalyst to collaborate on innovative solutions to the greatest challenges facing Oaxaca. This first grant will go toward two initiatives – 1)  relocation of their facility to increase size and quality of space and allow for more diverse services, 2)  creation of a mobile HUB to provide networking services and resources to surrounding rural areas. The focus is on information sharing and idea development among peers, leveraging resources across the State of Oaxaca. It will also strengthen communities through workshops and events to improve skills of members.

Puente – $3,000  Mexico:  Formed in 2004 to re-introduce Amaranth production into communities for improved child and family nutrition. Pangea’s first year grant will help three women’s groups who are experiencing difficulties due to extreme migration issues among male population. The grant will strengthen community and empower women through training in management of community based local enterprise, and includes five workshops in organization, leadership and best social and business practices. Locally produced organic amaranth will help to alleviate poverty and improve health and well-being.

Sikanda – $5,000 Mexicofounded by two graduate students (one from Oaxaca) who worked for a decade in marginalized/impoverished communities in Latin America, Asia and Europe. Pangea’s first grant to Sikanda is supporting Transforming Trash, a program to give pepenadores (trash pickers) living in landfill areas in Oaxaca, the tools and capacity to convert organic waste into compost, to both market and use in their own food gardens, thus converting trash into a source of sustainable income and food.  The young and dedicated co-founders have already made a difference in the lives of the families we visited in Oaxaca’s largest landfill.

2011

CEADEL Guatemala: funding to continue support for a program that encourages boys and girls working in the informal market to return to school. The program includes direct support to 32 children as well as after-school recreational and cultural activities that build children’s self esteem and provide human rights education.

Maya Aj Sya Guatemalafunding to continue supporting traditional Mayan education for 83 students, and purchase land to build a new school. (Funds for land purchase contingent on approval of engineering survey.)

New Hope Foundation (FNE) Guatemala: funding to help create the New Hope Cultural Center for local art and traditions of the indigenous Maya Achi people.  Create masks and costumes, and develop scripts and scores for traditional dances that explain the Mayan cosmovision.

Light for All Haiti:  funding to continue operating support for primary school (includes teacher salaries, books and supplies, teacher training and supplies for health center).

Haiti Konpay Haiti: funding to continue support for the Food and Fuel Alternative Center funded last year and to provide capacity-building for the staff.

Circle of Women Mexico: funding to expand an existing adult literacy program that teaches women to read both Mixtec (indigenous language) and Spanish in two communities in the Mixtec region

2009

Adopt-a-Village Guatemalafunding to develop a technical training program on sustainable agriculture that links secondary school students at a Mayan Center with women leaders in 9 rural villages.

CEADEL Guatemalasupport for the return to school of 20 girls and boys working in the informal labor market (shoe shine, gum and candy sales). Includes regular home visits with parents and after school activities to build children’s self esteem and educate them on rights.

COMUNDICH Guatemala:  support for political (citizenship) and technology training for 110 youth in 4 schools in 2 municipalities.

MAYA AJ SYA Guatemala:  support for  teacher training and improvement of teacher retention rates for a bi-lingual, intercultural pre-school and primary school for indigenous Mayan youth.

Light for All Haiti: support for operation of the school by paying teachers’ salaries, purchasing supplies, and supporting a project to grow trees that will provide oil for fuel.

Haiti Konpay Haiti: construction of a center for a volunteer youth organization to house a chicken aviary and production area for alternative charcoal briquettes and rocket stoves.  The grant includes partial funding for an erosion control project.

CEDICAM Mexico: support for an income-generating activity to produce and sell organic fertilizers.

2008

Adopt-a-Village Guatemala: funding to offer advanced veterinary training for students in 10 Mayan villages who completed basic training funded by last year’s grant. This grant benefits not just the students but also the villagers in this remote region where the nearest veterinary services are 60 km away. Students will graduate as assistant veterinarians.

COMUNDICH Guatemalafunding to complete the next phase of a project to provide training in leadership, computer skills, and the arts to youth in a high-risk area where teens are being recruited into the drug trafficking business. Our 2007 grant funded the start of this project.

Light for All Haiti: funding to replace books, uniforms and school supplies destroyed in floods caused by recent hurricanes. Grant funds will also be used to support a school clinic and to expand a project to grow Jatropha trees that produce oil for fuel.

Haiti Konpay Haiti: funding to reconstruct agricultural fields on the mountainside surrounding two village water sources, replant fields with control channels, and install a large drainage system to stop soil erosion and reduce the likelihood of crop loss and flash floods.

Living Earth Institute Nicaraguafunding to work with a local organization to increase access to water and sanitation for five schools in southwestern Nicaragua. The project will include water storage tanks, latrines, and hand-washing stations at each school.

2007

Adopt-a-Village Guatemala: used Pangea funds for basic veterinary education to students in 10 villages in a remote area where the nearest veterinary services are 60 km away.

Guatemala Friendship School Guatemalafunding used to build toilets and hand-washing sinks for use by the school’s 67 students.

COMUNDICH Guatemala: started a training program for at-risk youth in leadership, computer skills, and the arts in a high-risk area where teens are being recruited into the drug trafficking business.

Lambi Fund Haiti: built five cisterns to store water in one of the most arid parts of Haiti.

Kinal Antezetik Mexico: funding for 15 workshops to train villagers in basic health education and use of natural medicines to cure common ailments.

Jubilee House Community Nicaragua: funding to build a pipeline to supply water from an existing well to a refugee camp and coffee cooperative , neither of which had access to clean water. funding to build two water storage cisterns and repair existing latrines at a school in Diria that had 550 students. One cistern to catch and store rainwater; the other to store water from the municipal supply, which was often out of service for several days.

2006

Jubilee House Community Nicaragua: funding to facilitate an exchange between the COMAMNUVI sewing cooperative and worker-owned cooperatives in El Salvador and Mexico to transfer skills and provide training on how to establish themselves as a free trade zone.

2005

Lambi Fund Haiti: funding used to start a cooperative plowing service for the area farmers, using the profits from the service to establish a micro-credit fund for its members.

CEDICAM Oaxaca, Mexico: funding to continue the Ita Nuni Marketing Association funded in 2004. This phase was a training course to teach 20 peasant families the marketing and business skills they need to make this cooperative project successful.

2004

Haitian Health Foundation Haiti: added to an existing goat breeding & distribution program to provide food, milk, and economic opportunity for families in remote villages. Pangea funded the distribution of 60 additional goats. The goat offspring were used to contribute to a Food program, to give to another family in the village, to eat, and to sell.

Lambi Fund Haiti: built a sugar cane mill in the Tach area of Haiti to enable the farmers there to mill their sugar cane on site, saving time and effort and increasing the income they receive from their crops.

Peasant Movement Haiti: (MPP)/Grassroots International started a large project to plant 200,000 trees in five Haitian communities, educate the population about the relationship between trees and soil erosion, establish 4 experimental organic farms, conserve 600 acres of land by implementing bio-mechanical structures for soil conservation; and protect water sources by placing 800 threshold dikes made from drystone walls. Pangea funded 20% of the first year’s work.

CEDICAM Oaxaca, Mexico: pilot project to form a farming and marketing cooperative for local produce. Two groups of 10 families each grew and marketed organic, healthy food that will appeal to the local palate. The project included construction of a greenhouse, purchase of a truck to take products to market, and market site storage and staffing.

Kinal Antezetik Mexico: funding for 15 workshops to train villagers in basic health education and use of natural medicines to cure common ailments.

Jubilee House Managua, Nicaraguaused its grant to add to the revolving loan fund it uses to provide credit to the community of people displaced by Hurricane Mitch. The first loan from Pangea funds was used to repair and upgrade the machinery at a successful women’s sewing cooperative which a Pangea delegation visited in May 2004.

 

2003

Centro de Desarrollo Integral Campesino de la Mixteca (CEDICAM) Oaxaca, Mexico: This mountainous region receives an annual rainfall of only 30-40 centimeters and has some of the most eroded lands in the Americas. Pangea funded two projects with CEDICAM. One collected rainwater during the rainy season and stored it in cisterns for use by the community school and individual households. The second built contour ditches on hillsides above threatened springs and shallow wells to recharge the aquifers which feed these drinking water sources. The community has already seen results from both projects.

Agua Para La Vida San Isidro, Nicaraguaworked with the community of San Isidro, a village of poor subsistence farmers northeast of Rio Blanco in Nicaragua. San Isidro, like other villages in the region, had no local access to uncontaminated water. Women had to travel long distances to carry small quantities of water for their families. Aqua Para La Vida and the community built a gravity driven drinking water system that delivers safe water to the far-flung houses that make up the community.

El Porvenir Nicaragua: built a similar water system in the village of Bijagua. The project built a concrete lid for the nearest uncontaminated source to protect the source from contamination, and constructed a gravity-flow system that pipes water to individual household taps in 50 homes and 3 public taps in the center of town.